Hard and soft colors of an Angelfish (Pterophyllum)

Freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) at the Montreal Biodome
Hard and soft colors of a freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) at the Montreal Biodome

Ceramic artwork colors for an Angelfish (Pterophyllum)

Ceramic artwork colors for a Angelfish (Pterophyllum)
Ceramic artwork colors for a Angelfish (Pterophyllum)

Ceramic artwork accent colors for an Angelfish


Sometimes color schemes just jump out at you when you look at a real life fish or a good photograph. In the case of the Angelfish accent colors comes to mind quickly. This is a little bit of color that contrasts with all the others in as many characteristics as possible. This bit of color is sometimes referred to as the accent color. As you can see by the photographs and video the accent color of the Angelfish is the darker tones represented in the above color chart. When creating ceramic art work for wall hanging decor it's important to use the right accent colors. I usually stick to primary colors for accent colors that complement the main hue of the fish.

Pterophyllum is a small genus of freshwater fish from the Cichlidae family known to most aquarists as angelfish. All species of Pterophyllum originate from the Amazon Basin, the Orinoco Basin and the various rivers in the Guiana Shield in tropical South America. The three species of Pterophyllum are oddly shaped because the cichlids are strongly laterally compressed, with round bodies and elongated triangular dorsal and anal fins.

A group of Pterophyllum altum
A group of Pterophyllum altum

Ceramic artwork colors for a group of Pterophyllum altum

Ceramic artwork colors for a group of Pterophyllum altum
Ceramic artwork colors for a group of Pterophyllum altum
Their body shape allows them to hide between roots and plants, often on a vertical surface. Naturally occurring angelfish are often striped longitudinally, resulting in extra camouflage. Angelfish is an ambush predator and a host to small fish and macroinvertebrates. All Pterophyllum species are monogamous pairs. Generally, the eggs are laid on a submerged log or a flattened leaf. As with other cichlids, brood care is highly developed.

Angelfish is one of the most widely kept freshwater aquarium species, as well as the most commonly kept cichlid. They are admired for their unique shape, color and behavior. It wasn't until the late 1920s until the early 1930s that angelfish was bred in captivity in the United States.

Pterophyllum scalare is the most widely kept species in the aquarium. Most individuals in the aquarium trade are captive-bred. Captive-bred Pterophyllum altum is sometimes available. Pterophyllum leopoldi is the most difficult to find in trade.

An adolescent silver angelfish
An adolescent silver angelfish

Ceramic artwork colors for an adolescent silver angelfish

Ceramic artwork colors for an adolescent silver angelfish
Ceramic artwork colors for an adolescent silver angelfish
Angelfish are kept in a small tank, preferably about 80 ° F (27 ° C). While angelfish are members of the cichlid family, they are generally peaceful when not mating; however, the general rule of "big fish eat little fish" is applicable. For pet stores, freshwater angelfish is usually in the semi-aggressive category. Most tetras and barbs are compatible with angelfish, but some are small enough to fit the angelfish in the mouth. Generous portions of food should be available so that the angelfish do not get hungry and turn on their tank mates.

Koi angelfish - P. scalare
Koi angelfish - P. scalare

Ceramic artwork colors for a Koi angelfish - P. scalare

Ceramic artwork colors for a Koi angelfish - P. scalare
Ceramic artwork colors for a Koi angelfish - P. scalare
Most of the angelfish strains available in fish-keeping hobby are the result of many decades of selective breeding. Most of the original crosses of wild angelfish have not been reported and confusion is popular between the various species of Pterophyllum, in particular P. scalare and P. leopoldi. This makes the roots of "domestic angelfish" unclear. Domestic strains are most likely a set of genes from more than one species of wild angelfish combined with mutation selection in domesticated lines over the last 60 years or more.

The consequence is a domestic angelfish that is a true hybrid with little more than a superficial resemblance to the wild Pterophyllum species. Much of the work on the documented genetics of P. scalare is the product of studies by Dr. Joanne Norton, who published a series of 18 papers in Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Magazine.

References
Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Magazine
Freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) at the Montreal Biodome
A group of Pterophyllum altum
An adolescent silver angelfish
Koi angelfish - P. scalare


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