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Color equilibrium of a Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)

Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)
Color equilibrium of a Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)

Ceramic artwork colors for a Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)

Ceramic artwork colors for a Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)
Equilibrium in artwork colors for a Pearl Gourami fish

Color equilibrium and composition of a Pearl Gourami fish for ceramic wall decor


Upon examination of why this color scheme can work so well on ceramic wall art depends on how well the artist embraces one of the most basic principles of color composition. Keep in mind that color has four basic characteristics. Shade or hue, temperature, meaning and saturation. Briefly, the hue is the identity of the color in comparison to the spectrum of light. The names are blue, green, red, gray, color by color. Technically, color temperature is a subset of shadow, but it is as important to the artist as the other three. Warm colors such as reds, oranges and yellows are associated with fire, while cool colors such as blues and greens are associated with items that are relatively cold, such as ice, snow, sky and water. As you can see by the video and the photographs the Pearl Gourami fish has a combination of both.


Pearl gourami male Trichopodus leerii
Pearl gourami male, Trichopodus leerii
Ceramic artwork colors for a Pearl gourami male, Trichopodus leerii
Ceramic artwork colors for a Pearl gourami male, Trichopodus leerii
Pearl gourami or Trichopodus leerii is a gourami species native to South East Asia. Such fish are about 12 centimeters or 4.7 inches in total length. The body is a brownish-silver color, painted in a pearl-like pattern with a distinct black line running from the fish's head, and slowly thinning towards the caudal fin. This fish has given rise to many popular names, such as lace gourami and mosaic gourami.

Male specimens of this species, typical of many gourams, are generally larger and more colorful than their female counterparts. They have bright orange coloring around the throat, which at breeding time becomes much darker and is used to court the female. Males also show some orange tinge in their fins, with the exception of a caudal or tail fin. The male also has longer fins, with a more pointed dorsal fin and enlarged anal fin.

A tank with a capacity of 120 liters or 30 gallons or more is ideal for a pair of pearl gouramis, although anything above that volume is highly recommended, as these fish show signs of stress, excessive hostility and disease when feeling confined. Preferred tank temperatures range between 22 and 28 ° C (72 and 82F). Tanks with surfaces exposed to fresh air are recommended so that the labyrinth organ of the pearl gourami can function properly. Adequate filtration, lighting, substrate and decoration, plants and proper care are required, as with any tropical aquarium.

Pearl gourami is a territorial fish and should only be used in a group reservoir of fish of a similar size. Nevertheless, this fish may be somewhat timid or shy, and it should not be kept with fish that are too wild or aggressive. In reality, in the first few days or weeks, these fish usually show intense shyness and timidity, spending a lot of time hiding, regardless of tank-mates or water resources. When, however, under the right conditions, they evolve out of this and become more open and gregarious, becoming social fish.

Although somewhat rough, pearl gouramis may be vulnerable to disease. Clean tanks are a must for gourami pearls. Most gourams feel more at home when the tank is filled with many plants, decorations and ornaments that provide safe havens for fish in times of stress.

Pearl gourami is a bubble nest maker who uses plants to help tie the bubbles together. The water level should be reduced to 20 cm (8 in) during spawning,[7] and the temperature should be approximately 28 ° C (82 ° F) and the pH should be around 7. Both adults can not be kept together after spawning. The eggs will hatch after two days, and the fries will be free to swim three days later. Once they begin to swim easily, the fries can be fed infusoria and brine shrimp and, a week later, finely ground flakes. Freeze-dried tablets may also be fed to older frys.

The gourami pearl has a very rare and elegant mating dance. The male builds a nest of small, long-lasting bubbles. The female sits under the egg, and the male curves her body closely around her, from below, as if protecting her. Her body flickers while she's expelling a few sperm. He then releases her and picks up the eggs in his mouth as they slowly sink, and spits them into the bubble nest. This process is repeated several times, before her egg-laying is finished.

The fries are small in their hatching. The male must take responsibility for the fries, save them and spit them back into the nest if they fall out. Others tend to grow faster than others, and show fratricide, swallowing their little siblings.

References
Trichopodus leerii (Bleeker, 1852) Pearl gourami
Pearl Gourami (Trichopodus leerii)
Pearl gourami male, Trichopodus leerii

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